Klipsch Heresy One | Changes in progress

There’s no limits to the best
09.03.2014..

Pronouncing the name Klipsch makes shiver. Owning a pair of Klipsch loudspeakers delights you.

 

Moreover, if the speakers are a pair of Heresy first series of 1972 you ravish. The first production of the brand, personally worked by Colonel Paul, includes legendary models. If you bring home a vintage Horn or a Belle speaker in good conditions, that means being settled for an entire life of listening experience.

 

The Heresy I inserted in my system a couple of years ago are two jewels: sealed box design in birch solid wood, essential crossovers with double transformer and two capacitors, 12’’ K-22 woofer with suspension in treated red canvass, K-55V horn midrange by Atlas Sound and K-77 Electrovoice horn tweeter made out of Alnico.

With an adequate amplification the result is guaranteed: the music flows with extreme naturalness and strong emotional impact. I don’t mean that the Heresy are perfect. On the contrary they are a compromise to keep safe the features and the Klipsch qualitative standards in a version aimed to a budget market. Compromise means to modify some parameters. In our case it means, although in a harmonic and timbric contest of absolute excellence, a light bass, an unauthoritative mid and a high with a lack in refinement.

 

What to do to remedy? The first idea has been to predispose the Heresy for bi-amplification and to separate the bass from the mid-high range. In order to reinforce and widen the bass, I have thought to keep the original cabinet only for the woofer, so to retrieve litres of air where the driver could set free and express its huge potentialities. Thus, the horn drivers have been pulled out and fixed onto an external frame made of solid iroko wood, without side walls, far from standing waves and resonances.

 

In the same open structure, decoupled and on top of the speaker, I’ve put the new crossovers made by Bob Crites. The former wiring has been completely replaced with Western Electric cables of various sections. The binding posts have been replaced and integrated for bi-wiring. Also the supports are in solid iroko wood in order to preserve the aesthetic profile and individuate the right height of the components.

 

Since I’m not a technician, I haven’t kept into consideration any measurements or curves. I’ve just relayed on the listening sensations based on my hearing and sound taste.

 

The outcome is amazing.

 

The acoustic scene has exploded its three-dimensionality, the bass is energetic and deep, so extended that I’m still testing some solutions for a better control. The mid is coherent and precise, while the high is more delicate and less harsh. The upper frame, free to rotate, allows the calibration of a fine angle of the mid-high range with respect to the speakers body and to the listening spot.

 

The photo gallery shows all the manufacturing passages that have been made to realise the design.

 

Annex | Modified Klipsch Heresy One

and Sopranino ENIGMAcoustics supertweeter

 

The modification project of my Klipsch Heresy has got a further implementation with the Sopranino ENIGMAcoustics supertweeter. The Chief Editor Roberto Rocchi has written about in this recent article and besides exalting the qualities, he warned against a possible addiction. Well, I totally agree. The Sopranino are exceptional!

I’ve never heard a component affecting so deep the output and the quality of a Hi-End set. After a couple of months I can firmly say: I can’t do without them.

 

Look at the picture, they’re so beauty!

 

The project is not over. Next step will be the decoupling of the upper frame from the woofer cabinet through an air cushion sandwiched between the two structures.

Should someone be interested to a listening session can contact me at info@remusic.it.

 

For further info:

to Klipsch website

to ENIGMAcoustics website

Klipsch Heresy One. On the left the loudspeaker without the horns.
Klipsch Heresy One. On the left the loudspeaker without the horns.
Heresy from another angle.
Heresy from another angle.
The horn drivers pulled out from the cabinet.
The horn drivers pulled out from the cabinet.
The rear of the K-55v and K-77 drivers.
The rear of the K-55v and K-77 drivers.
The rear of the K-55v and K-77 drivers.
The rear of the K-55v and K-77 drivers.
Detail of the grid and original logo.
Detail of the grid and original logo.
The original crossover.
The original crossover.
Heresy without the rear panel. Note the fir supports where the screws were stripping the internal surfaces.
Heresy without the rear panel. Note the fir supports where the screws were stripping the internal surfaces.
The K-22 woofer.
The K-22 woofer.
The original labels.
The original labels.
The custom-cut panels to close the emission holes of the horns.
The custom-cut panels to close the emission holes of the horns.
The frames in iroko wood, new lodgements for the horns.
The frames in iroko wood, new lodgements for the horns.
Back view of the frames. The holes will house the binding posts.
Back view of the frames. The holes will house the binding posts.
The interior of the frames.
The interior of the frames.
The closing panel fixed using the same screws of the drivers.
The closing panel fixed using the same screws of the drivers.
Again the internal panel that seals the holes left by the mid-high drivers.
Again the internal panel that seals the holes left by the mid-high drivers.
Outside view of the emission holes of the horns sealed by the internal panel.
Outside view of the emission holes of the horns sealed by the internal panel.
The interior of the cabinet is completed. Note the Western Electric cables wrapped with damping material.
The interior of the cabinet is completed. Note the Western Electric cables wrapped with damping material.
The crossovers sent by Bob Crites.
The crossovers sent by Bob Crites.
Crossover in detail.
Crossover in detail.
The old crossovers. They have been replaced after 40 years.
The old crossovers. They have been replaced after 40 years.
The iroko frame with the drivers.
The iroko frame with the drivers.
The frame with all the components, with WE cables and golden binding posts.
The frame with all the components, with WE cables and golden binding posts.
The work is done.
The work is done.
The loudspeakers set and connected.
The loudspeakers set and connected.
Rear view of the speaker, with DIY WE power cables.
Rear view of the speaker, with DIY WE power cables.
The loudspeaker from another perspective.
The loudspeaker from another perspective.
Sight from the listening spot.
Sight from the listening spot.
A view of the system.
A view of the system.
Da Vinci Unison One turntable, Grandezza Reference 12'' tonearm, Koetsu Rosewood cartridge and J.A. Michell modified flywheel.
Da Vinci Unison One turntable, Grandezza Reference 12'' tonearm, Koetsu Rosewood cartridge and J.A. Michell modified flywheel.
The Klipsch Heresy One with the upper frames turned toward the inside.
The Klipsch Heresy One with the upper frames turned toward the inside.
Detail of the spinning.
Detail of the spinning.
Modified Klipsch Heresy One and Sopranino ENIGMAcoustics.
Modified Klipsch Heresy One and Sopranino ENIGMAcoustics.
Again Heresy and Sopranino.
Again Heresy and Sopranino.
Sopranino close-up.
Sopranino close-up.
Another detail.
Another detail.
by Giuseppe Trotto
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